Workshops

Workshops

Tuesday, September 24 • 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Tracks: CO, ExL, HR, LD
WO1 | Documenting Performance – Yes, It Does Matter
Michael S. Cohen, JD | Duane Morris LLP
Room: TBA
We’ve said it to our managers too many times to count – “Have you documented it?” Far too often, the answer is “No.” As we know, proper documentation is crucial for a myriad of employee relations issues. Just as important, when it comes to discrimination, retaliation, and other wrongful discharge claims, legal liability often turns on the documentation. But it’s not enough simply to document, document, document. Poor documentation is as dangerous as no documentation. The key is not only what you say but also how and when you say it. This seminar focuses on the legal, management, and human resource issues implicated in disciplinary documentation. Because these kinds of flaws are common to performance appraisals, this seminar will also examine the necessity of, and common mistakes seen in, the performance appraisal process.

Handouts

Tracks: ET
WO2 | Promoting Ethics Through Social Capital Part 1
Al Condeluci, PhD | Consultant
Room: TBA
Ethics is quite simply treating people fairly, honestly, and with respect. Ethics also includes other pro-social behaviors such as tolerance, kindness, compassion, and dignity. We also know that people who experience differences in culture are at risk of being treated unethically. Although none of us can assure that all people are treated with respect, we can look at ways and means to better promote ethics by understanding the impact of relationships in our lives. Sociologists call this “social capital,” and it is amazing what our relationships do for us. This session will help you think about how important friendships are and how they can be better developed over time, and in turn, build a more ethical community.

Handouts

Tracks: BO, ExL, FM, LD
WO3 | Alternative Approach to Mergers & Acquistions: Network Constellation Part 1
Ryan D. Smith | Inperium, Inc.
Jay Deppeler | Inperium, Inc.
Room: TBA
This interactive presentation offers participants the opportunity to learn — in vivid detail — the advantages of an exclusive affiliation model. The presenters will share firsthand experience of how this unique affiliation model connects organizations in a way that maintains each affiliate’s individual mission, history, identity, and culture. They will also demonstrate the measurable advantages that are realized in creating fiscal sustainability, program quality, compliance and integrity, and new opportunities for growth and expansion. The presentation will highlight the affiliation model’s attention to program-fiscal balance considerations, along with perspectives associated with each presenter’s leadership style. Participants will hear how transformational change leadership supports the new organizational structure, team composition, and environment.

Handouts

Tracks: IDD
WO4 | Understanding the Barriers to Self-Determination: A Provider Perspective
Cory Gilden | National Leadership Consortium on Developmental Disabilities at the University of Delaware
Caitlin Bailey | National Leadership Consortium on Developmental Disabilities at the University of Delaware
Michael Hammond | Optum
Room: TBA
To be fully responsive to people with disabilities, many service providers are working to shift their operations and services to offer individualized, self-directed supports. However, the national movement toward self-directed services has been slow, utilized by fewer than 15% of people with disabilities today. This session will share findings from the Optum Spark! Initiative’s national survey of service providers to offer insight into the barriers and supports agencies face while making this transition. The session will highlight concrete organizational and state level strategies associated with agencies’ capacity to provide self-directed services, offering attendees ideas to implement in their own organizations.

Handouts

Tracks: MH
WO5 | Intercept Zero: Towards a Criminologically Informed Mental Health System Part 1
James D. Fouts, LSW | Forensic Systems Solutions
Room: TBA
How can the mental health system intervene to prevent the criminalization of people with mental illness? Intercept Zero is an effective, criminologically informed initiative that includes crisis intervention, behavioral health treatment, social services, health care services, prevention strategies, collaboration initiatives, cross system education, and regulatory practices. Part one will review the Sequential Intercept Model, identify factors that put those with mental illness at risk for criminogenic behaviors, and introduce the Core Components of an effective Intercept Zero Initiative. Part two will more deeply explore the aspects of the Core Components, including outlining a primer education for mental health professionals in criminogenic risks.

Handouts

Tracks: BO, ExL, HRF, LD
WO6 | Using Appreciative Inquiry to Affect Culture Change in a Nonprofit Organization
Robert F. Gulick, MFA, BCBA | Achievement Center
Evan Tucker, MA, LPC | Achievement Center
Heather Salter | Achievement Center
Room: TBA
The Achievement Center is a 95-year old nonprofit agency that provides outpatient and community-based mental health and early intervention services in a six-county region of northwest Pennsylvania. Within the last decade, the agency has experienced increasing financial difficulties and declining employee morale. Appreciative Inquiry (A.I.) was introduced to the agency as a strengths-based philosophy for organizational change in January of 2018. This presentation will tell the story of how the philosophy of A.I. was introduced, how buy-in from senior leadership was accomplished, how an A.I. process culminating in our Strive to Soar Summit (attended by nearly all 250 employees) was planned and executed, and how the results of that A.I. summit have begun to transform the agency in new and wonderful ways.

Handouts

Tracks: DA, MH
WO7 | Talking Recovery: In Four Words or Less
Jeff DeSantis, MM | Resources for Human Development
Pam Kasinetz, LCSW | Resources for Human Development
Room: TBA
As we strive to create collaborative and effective recovery plans with the individuals whom we serve, we may often notice that our documentation needs and clinical focus occasionally overshadow the fact that recovery assessment and planning is a personalized process. This presentation presents a different angle on the recovery planning process – perhaps asking the right questions may be simpler than we’ve been making it.

Handouts

Tracks: MH
WO8 | Education: The Forgotten Variable in the Treatment of Youth
Barry L. McCurdy, PhD, NCSP, BCBA-D | Devereux Center for Effective Schools
Rachel Eisenberg, PhD, NCSP | Devereux Center for Effective Schools
Lisa Thomas, PhD, NCSP | Devereux Center for Effective Schools
Room: TBA
Youth with emotional and behavioral disorders often have significant and severe academic deficits. The purpose of this presentation is to provide an overview of one multi-site residential program’s approach to addressing the educational needs of the students in their care. Through didactic overview and large group discussion, executives, administrators, and others in attendance will be able to describe the importance of — and long-range outcomes associated with — addressing student academic deficits in residential and correctional facility schools, and leave with a plan regarding how to initiate the organizational change process.

Handouts

Tuesday, September 24 • 2:45 pm – 4:15 pm

Tracks: BO, CO, ExL, HR, LD
WO9 | Dear Helga’s Back With New and More Complicated Issues
Michael S. Cohen, JD | Duane Morris LLP
Room: TBA
Helga is back again and tackling more complicated issues facing her organization! While we don’t yet know for certain what Helga will confront in 2019, given the goings on in the workplace, she seems focused on harassment prevention in the #metoo era, navigating employee requests for leaves of absence, confronting workplace violence, and more! Designed for managers and human resources professionals, this animated session will focus on uncommon HR issues and examine practical, business-focused solutions that you can use immediately to solve those problems.

Handouts

Tracks: ET
W10 | Promoting Ethics through Social Capital Part 2
Al Condeluci, PhD | Consultant
Room: TBA
Ethics is quite simply treating people fairly, honestly, and with respect. Ethics also includes other pro-social behaviors such as tolerance, kindness, compassion, and dignity. We also know that people who experience differences in culture are at risk of being treated unethically. Although none of us can assure that all people are treated with respect, we can look at ways and means to better promote ethics by understanding the impact of relationships in our lives. Sociologists call this “social capital,” and it is amazing what our relationships do for us. This session will help you think about how important friendships are and how they can be better developed over time, and in turn, build a more ethical community.

Handouts

Tracks: BO, ExL, FM, LD
W11 | Alternative Approach to Mergers & Acquistions: Network Constellation Part 2
Ryan D. Smith | Inperium, Inc.
Jay Deppeler | Inperium, Inc.
Room: TBA
This interactive presentation offers participants the opportunity to learn — in vivid detail — the advantages of an exclusive affiliation model. The presenters will share firsthand experience of how this unique affiliation model connects organizations in a way that maintains each affiliate’s individual mission, history, identity, and culture. They will also demonstrate the measurable advantages that are realized in creating fiscal sustainability, program quality, compliance and integrity, and new opportunities for growth and expansion. The presentation will highlight the affiliation model’s attention to program-fiscal balance considerations, along with perspectives associated with each presenter’s leadership style. Participants will hear how transformational change leadership supports the new organizational structure, team composition, and environment.

Handouts

Tracks: CH, DA, HRF, MH
W12 | School Safety and Security Transformation – A Case Study
Robert J. Spengler, MA | Catasauqua Area School District
Kimberly A. Benner, MA, MS, CPRP | Salisbury Behavioral Health, Inc.
Donald J. Panto, II | Catasauqua Area School District
Room: TBA
School-based behavioral health services lie at the heart of school safety and security. The Catasauqua Area School District (CASD) shares their business case for expanded school-based behavioral health services as a core strategy for comprehensive school safety and security. CASD’s innovation strategy focuses on: 1) healthier children and families through early detection, intervention, and assessment; 2) student and staff including QPR, Mental Health First Aid, and Trauma-Informed Care Techniques; 3) the development of strategic alternate payment models that explore episodes of care aligned within value-based purchasing; 4) team-based focus that bridges the school and community settings for children and families; and 5) an outcome of strengthened overall school safety and security.

Handouts

Tracks: MH
W13 | Intercept Zero: Towards a Criminologically Informed Mental Health System Part 2
James D. Fouts, LSW | Forensic Systems Solutions
Room: TBA
How can the mental health system intervene to prevent the criminalization of people with mental illness? Intercept Zero is an effective, criminologically informed initiative that includes crisis intervention, behavioral health treatment, social services, health care services, prevention strategies, collaboration initiatives, cross system education, and regulatory practices. Part one will review the Sequential Intercept Model, identify factors that put those with mental illness at risk for criminogenic behaviors, and introduce the Core Components of an effective Intercept Zero Initiative. Part two will more deeply explore the aspects of the Core Components, including outlining a primer education for mental health professionals in criminogenic risks.

Handouts

Tracks: BI, CH, DA, ExL, HRF, IDD, MH, PDA, VR
W14 | New Opportunities for Independence: The Promise of Generic, “Smart Home” Technology
Susan Tachau, MA | Pennsylvania Assistive Technology Foundation
Kirby G. Smith | SunKirb Ideas, LLC
Room: TBA
An explosion of new IoT promises to make it possible for individuals with disabilities and older Pennsylvanians to have greater control over their own lives. While some of these devices are customized, many others can be purchased off-the-shelf, which makes them more affordable and easier to use. Generic smart home devices can do such things as turn on/off lights and fans, identify who’s at the door and allow entry, control thermostats, make phone calls, read books, play music, and much more! This session will focus on defining and learning about generic “smart home” devices, as well as exploring funding possibilities.

Handouts

Tracks: IDD, VR
W15 | ACCSES National Vocational Update
Kate McSweeney | ACCSES
Room: TBA
This presentation will provide Federal updates presented by Kate McSweeney of ACCSES.

Handouts

Tracks: ExL
W16 | Inside Advocacy: Effective Government Relations
Brandi Phillips, MS | Allegheny HealthChoices, Inc.
Claire Smyth, BS | Familylinks
Room: TBA
Threats to behavioral health funding continue with every budget cycle, and then some. Learn how to most effectively advocate for your organization by successfully engaging with your federal, state, and local legislators. This session will provide strategies, tips, and tools to be most effective in legislative advocacy efforts.

Handouts

Wednesday, September 25 • 9:00 am – 10:30 am

Tracks: BI, CH, DA, ExL, IDD, LD, MR, MH, PDA, VR
W17 | Raising Barns While Taking Down Silos: Cooperative Collaboration is Key
Bridget G. Lowery, MS, CBIST | Main Line Rehabilitation Associates
Stefanie Bauman, CBIS | Success Rehabilitation, Inc.
Room: TBA
In order for collaboration to be successful, it is important to break down silos that may exist. Much like an Amish barn raising, where the community comes together, and each person contributes their area of expertise to the project, the use of a collaborative team can be helpful in developing the interventions that will allow us to meet the holistic needs of individuals with disabilities, including those with cognitive impairment. During this workshop, attendees will discuss the process of building collaborative environments, both within their organizations and with other providers. They will identify and find solutions for barriers which may be standing in the way of their consumers’ success and discover ways in which they can improve communication and collaboration to the mutual benefit of all.

Handouts

Tracks: DA
W18 | Implications for Whole-Person Care in Opioid Treatment Programs: Lessons Learned from PA’s Centers of Excellence Initiative
Jason Snyder | Pinnacle Treatment Centers
Pam Gehlmann, MA, NCC, LPC | Pinnacle Treatment Centers
Room: TBA
In 2016, Pennsylvania launched the Centers of Excellence (COE) initiative to expand access to and improve opioid addiction treatment. COE objectives were: 1) treat the whole person by integrating behavioral and physical health care; 2) implement community-based care management teams; and 3) increase access to medication-assisted treatment. Three of Pinnacle Treatment Centers’ (PTC) 13 Pennsylvania opioid treatment programs were named COEs. With nearly three years’ experience operating those COEs, PTC will discuss lessons learned. A regional director of operations and a regional director of strategic partnerships for PTC will share their experiences with development of COEs.

Handouts

Tracks: MH
W19 | Trauma Informed Care: How Challenging Behaviors are Helpful
David Paone, MEd, CPRP | Salisbury Behavioral Health, Inc.
Jeff Duke, BS | Salisbury Behavioral Health, Inc.
Room: TBA
Using Trauma Informed Care involves a change in perspective. Sometimes, caregivers are quick to correct, fix, or change challenging behaviors in the individuals they support through corrective action plans, treatment plans, etc. Caregivers that use trauma informed care are curious and seek to answer the questions “why” and “how is this behavior helpful.” With trust, the self-capacities (true reasons why we engage in behavior) can be discovered and healthier alternatives can be taught using the psychiatric rehabilitation principles.

Handouts

Tracks: BO, CO, HR, LD
W20 | Group Supervision Strategies: The Reflecting Team Approach
Kevin Kumpf, PhD | Merakey
Kristin Cline, MS, LPC, CAADC | Merakey
Room: TBA
Group supervision is a common practice for providers who work for a mental health services agency. Although common, group supervision is often difficult to conduct effectively and efficiently. This presentation will give participants an overview of group supervision tactics, focusing mainly on the Reflecting Team Model, including a case study. This model allows participants to engage thoughtfully in group supervision and provides a framework to avoid overt criticism or fear of direct confrontation from more seasoned staff in the supervisory group.

Handouts

Tracks: CH, MH
W21 | Intensive Family Coaching
Megan Hoffman, LPC | Wesley Family Services
Kate Pompa, MSCP, LPC, NCC | Wesley Family Services
Pamela Dotson, LPC | Community Care Behavioral Health
Virginia Johnson, PhD | Community Care Behavioral Health
Room: TBA
Intensive Family Coaching (IFC) is an adaptation of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) for use in the home. This model uses evidence-based practices to strengthen the behavior management skills of caregivers and enhance the relationship between caregiver and child. This presentation will describe the treatment model in detail and will define families who may benefit from its use. Preliminary treatment outcomes will be summarized.

Handouts

Tracks: IDD, PDA
W22 | Evaluating for Dementia with the Intellectually Disabled Population
Lisa M. May, PhD | Safe Harbor Behavioral Health of UPMC
Room: TBA
Dementia is estimated to be two to three times more common with the ID population, yet many clinicians do not feel comfortable assessing for or diagnosing cognitive changes with this population. This workshop will review important issues related to the assessment of individuals with an intellectual disability, including the clinical manifestations of dementia, diagnostic challenges, diagnostic overshadowing, and assessment methods. Special considerations related to environment and communication style will be reviewed.

Handouts

Tracks: BO, CH, IDD
W23 | Community-Based Behavioral Health Infection Control Program
Lea Anne Gardner, PhD, RN | Devereux Advanced Behavioral Health
Jeffrey Di Guiseppe, MSN, RN | Devereux Advanced Behavioral Health
Room: TBA
Infection control (IC) is an area of medical care that touches all populations of people, adds value to care delivery, and needs to be integrated into physical and behavioral health care settings. This presentation highlights the importance of flexibility and adaptation to achieve the institution of this essential population health program. Opportunities and challenges to developing and implementing a universal IC program include methods to operationalizing it across residential, group home, and outpatient settings. Implementation strategies will be examined and include a multi-disciplinary collaboration, starting with board members and senior leadership, identification of performance metrics, instituting surveillance, monitoring, and reporting activities, development of training programs, and designing electronic health record forms and reports.

Handouts

Wednesday, September 25 • 10:45 am – 12:15 pm

Tracks: BO, ExL, FM, LD, PDA
W24 | Tips & Secrets for MCO Contracting: A Voices for Independence Case Study to Demonstrate Success
Shona Eakin | Voices for Independence
Carrie Bach | Voices for Independence
Fady B. Sahhar, PhD | XtraGlobex, Inc.
Room: TBA
The session will describe how Voices for Independence documented its effective Nursing Home Transition processes, anticipated the changes under managed care and prepared the staff, and developed detailed measures for demonstrating the effectiveness of its processes in supporting consumers transitioning from nursing facilities into the community. The evidence-based results were the basis for communicating with the Managed Care Organizations (MCOs) in Pennsylvania, culminating in Value-Based Contracts.

Handouts

Tracks: BO, FM
W25 | Foundation Funding
Joni S. Schwager, LSW | Staunton Farm Foundation
Room: TBA
As government funding continues to shrink and organizations are required to take on additional financial risk, as in value-based payments, foundation and grant funding are needed more than ever, until new payment arrangements become sustainable. In this session, you will learn about the different types of foundations, how to approach a funder, and ask for a grant. Finally, you will learn what questions you can expect during a site visit and how to respond.

Handouts

Tracks: IDD
W26 | A Whole Life Approach to Independent Living
Jill Gromen, MSW | Philadelphia Independence Network of JEVS Human Services
Lois Frischling | Philadelphia Independence Network of JEVS Human Services
Elyse Pearson | Philadelphia Independence Network of JEVS Human Services
Room: TBA
A Philadelphia human service provider is using an innovative approach to support adults with diverse disabilities, identities, and needs to live independently. Through open collaboration with program members, families, and community partnerships, people are living, working, and fully participating in their communities. During this session, participants will receive an overview of the key program elements, outcomes, challenges, and highlights of what we have learned as a community since the inception of the program. We will discuss recent program replication and future considerations. A family member and program participant will share firsthand accounts of personal perspectives and value-based outcomes.

Handouts

Tracks: LD
W27 | Becoming a Person of Influence
Ed Krow, SPHR, CCP, SHRM-SCP | Ed Krow, LLC
Room: TBA
The power to change your life and the lives of others depends on the degree of your influence. Without influence, success is impossible. However, one need not be famous or be in a high-profile position to be a person of influence. Each person, whether they intend it or not, is an influencer. Do you recall when your parents would tell you to stay away from certain people because they were a bad influence, or not to go to certain places in order to avoid potential problems? The places we go, the things we do, and the people in our lives influence who we are, what we do, and the results we get. Things happen daily that have some level of influence on us. Now, along with actions and words influencing us, each one of us possesses the same power to influence others through our own actions and words.

Handouts

Tracks: HRF, MH
W28 | Behavioral Health Home Plus and the Art of the SMART Goal for Healthy Change
Leslie Washington, MSW, LCSW | Community Care Behavioral Health Organization
Claudette Haner, RN, NBC-HWC | The Guidance Center
E. Scott Henderson III, CPS | The Guidance Center
Jaspreet Brar, MD, PhD | Western Psychiatric Hospital and Community Care Behavioral Health Organization
Room: TBA
Persons with serious mental illness (SMI) are dying 25 years earlier than the general population from largely preventable, lifestyle related diseases. The Behavioral Health Home Plus (BHHP) infrastructure is designed to partner with the individual and support their ability to self-manage their health and reduce their risk for disease. Through a variety of wellness-based tools that promote and encourage self-management and self-advocacy, people are empowered to create their own wellness. Creating a health and wellness related SMART goal helps to establish a person’s active role in self-management that may inspire and contribute to a happy, satisfying, and full life. This workshop encourages and demonstrates the art of creating a SMART goal in the journey to better health.

Handouts

Tracks: BO, ExL
W29 | Developing a Community Advisory Board: An Essential Resource for Your Organization
Mandy Fauble, PhD, LCSW | Safe Harbor Behavioral Health of UPMC Hamot
Victoria Merski, LCSW | Safe Harbor Behavioral Health of UPMC Hamot
Room: TBA
A focus on recovery and trauma informed care includes offering opportunities for stakeholders to provide meaningful contributions to the operations of agencies and their programs. In this workshop, we will describe the benefits of advisory boards, list concrete strategies to utilize advisory board input, and create a forum for planning strategies to engage advisors.

Handouts

Wednesday, September 25 • 1:45 pm – 3:15 pm

Tracks: CH, MH
W30 | Children’s Service Integration: A Framework for Scaling Evidence-Based Practice & Practice-Based Evidence to Support Resilience in Children & Families
Diane Lyle, LPC, MT-BC | Community Care Behavioral Health Organization
Amber Bott, MS | Community Care Behavioral Health Organization
Teri Stanley, CRC, LPC, BCBA | Community Care Behavioral Health Organization
Room: TBA
An integrated approach to providing high quality, behavioral health services for children is needed to address the high rate of unmet needs and often uncoordinated care. This workshop will provide an in-depth discussion of a framework for children’s services developed and tested by a behavioral health managed care organization in collaboration with state and county stakeholders, providers, and families. The framework, Children’s Services Integration (CSI), incorporates six core components into service delivery to provide consistent, high-quality programming across levels of care. Collaboration with other child-serving systems enhances coordinated care. CSI is associated with improved outcomes and is the cornerstone of transforming services across Pennsylvania, including services in schools, behavioral health rehabilitation services, and residential treatment facilities for youth.

Handouts

Tracks: BI, CH, DA, ExL, FM, IDD, MH, PDA, VR
W31 | Financial Education: A Necessity for All
Susan Tachau, MA | Pennsylvania Assistive Technology Foundation
Holly Zugay, CFP | PA Housing Finance Agency
Room: TBA
Money matters. The need to understand how to earn, use, save, grow, and protect money is essential for individuals with disabilities to achieve greater independence and autonomy. Because PA is an Employment First state and is creating more housing opportunities to make the transition to independent living, the demand for reliable and unbiased financial information has never been higher. This session will focus on key money topics, PA-specific programs (e.g., ABLE accounts), and financial education resources available to individuals with disabilities, direct care workers, and others.

Handouts

Tracks: ET
W32 | Ethics: The Five Pillars of Community Delivered Services Part 1
Greg McCutcheon, MA | Case Management Unit (CMU)
Room: TBA
Community-based services have become a melting pot for helpers who run the gamut of educational and training experiences. Workers who spend most of the time in the community often have the least exposure to the principles and codes of conduct that are essential in providing consistent and quality services. The five pillars of community services offer a strategy to introduce principle-based services and a unified approach to service delivery.

Handouts

Tracks: BO, IDD, LD, HR
W33 | Clinicians’ Role in Empowering Direct Support Professionals as Key Members of the Multidisciplinary Team
Michael May, EdD, LPC, BCBA, NADD-CC | Merakey
Robin VanEerden, MS, LPC, NADD-DDS/CC | Merakey
Room: TBA
Although treatment plans for individuals with intellectual and development disabilities (IDD) in residential facilities are often developed by graduate-level clinicians, implementation of those plans is mainly the responsibility of Direct Support Professionals (DSPs). The DSPs’ knowledge of the individual and the status of the outcomes is paramount in the development and modification of those plans. Despite their interdependent relationship, research suggests that DSPs often have negative attitudes towards clinicians. Negative feelings have the potential to affect treatment fidelity and contribute to the ongoing DSP shortage. However, clinicians using supportive behaviors can promote DSP empowerment, treatment fidelity, DSP/clinician work cohesiveness, and ultimately DSP retention. Guidelines for implementing evidence-based, clinician-driven supportive behaviors will be outlined and applied in this presentation.

Handouts

Tracks: CH, DA, LD, MH
W34 | Human Trafficking: PA’s Response to an Urgent Issue
Krista Hoffman | Governor’s Office of Homeland Security
Jackie Block Goldstein | Office of Human Security, Phiiladelphia Field Office
Trish Danner | US Department of Health & Human Services
Mary Tiernan | Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, Philadelphia Office
Room: TBA
Human trafficking is on the rise in correlation with the opioid epidemic. Half of trafficked individuals saw a health care professional and went unidentified. Learn what human trafficking resources are available and how to identify signs of trafficking.

Handouts

Tracks: BI, CH, DA, MH
W35 | Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD): Adult, Family, & Professional Perspectives
Gordon R. Hodas, MD | PA Office of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services
Lyn Becker, MBA, RMA | Pennsylvania FASD Task Force
Andrew J. Becker | Self-advocate
Room: TBA
This presentation considers Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASDs) from the perspective of an adult with an FASD, a parent, and a professional, with attention to FASD across the lifespan. FASD is a major public health problem in need of greater attention. Its prevalence greatly exceeds that of autism, and it is entirely preventable. After the basics are reviewed, learn from the adult with an FASD and his mother what the experience entails, what can make a difference, and how our service systems need to change.

Handouts

Tracks: HR, LD, MH
W36 | Reducing Burnout and Improving Care Through Trauma-Informed Supervision
Angela Chew, LCSW | Dickinson Center, Inc.
Room: TBA
We are not immune from the effects of trauma both directly and indirectly, personally and professionally. Trauma-Informed Supervision (TISV) is an important component to creating a culture of trauma-informed care within an organization. Learning to use TISV approaches for all individual/group supervision and staff meetings is critical to preventing and reducing the impact of vicarious trauma and burn-out. TISV can improve quality of services provided to the consumers and improve retention of staff. Staff report experiencing feelings of being valued and appreciated when TISV is used. This workshop will provide tools which may easily be implemented immediately following the presentation.

Handouts

Wednesday, September 25 • 3:30 pm – 5:00 pm

Tracks: BO, ExL, HRF, IDD, LD, MH, PDA, VR
W37 | Value-Based Payments Are in Your Organization’s Future – One Year Update!
Fady B. Sahhar, PhD | XtraGlobex, Inc.
Room: TBA
Value-based payment trends continue to affect the operations of human service agencies. Developments in Pennsylvania and other states during the past year make it even more important for an organization to be prepared, and to continuously examine its readiness to address its processes, costs, quality standards, and leadership. This session discusses strategies to be responsive and to maintain a competitive advantage.

Handouts

Tracks: CH, CO, DA, HRF, MH
W38 | From Open Access to Daily Huddle: Managing a Team-Based Approach for Admissions
Linda Messner, MEd, LPC | Berks Counseling Center
Bonnie Triebig, MS | Berks Counseling Center
Room: TBA
This session will address the benefits and lessons learned from developing an Admissions Team who meets daily to ensure fulfillment of all patient needs and maximize patient engagement. As health care providers, we are aware of the benefits of teamwork; however, working as a team can sometimes be challenging. Each organization has distinct and multiple factors that can either support or be a barrier to the team. The presentation will focus on variables and essential elements of powerful teams and effective team huddles. Discussion will emphasize the experience of the development and ongoing enhancement of the Admissions Team and its daily huddle.

Handouts

Tracks: ET
W39 | Ethics: The Five Pillars of Community Delivered Services Part 2
Greg McCutcheon, MA | Case Management Unit (CMU)
Room: TBA
Community-based services have become a melting pot for helpers who run the gamut of educational and training experiences. Workers who spend most of the time in the community often have the least exposure to the principles and codes of conduct that are essential in providing consistent and quality services. The five pillars of community services offer a strategy to introduce principle-based services and a unified approach to service delivery.

Handouts

Tracks: BI, DA, MR, MH, PDA
W40 | It’s all Relative: Harnessing the Power of Families in Rehab, Mental Health, Aging, and Substance Abuse Services
Barry J. Jacobs, PsyD | Health Management Associates
Room: TBA
The family members of consumers with chronic medical and behavioral health conditions can serve as vital partners in care with clinical teams. But they are often regarded ambivalently by health care and social service professionals, and marginalized in treatment plans. In this 90-minute session, we will discuss evidence-based best practices for engaging and supporting patients’ family members, as well as empowering them to serve as important facilitators of treatments and informants of treatment effects. Case and programmatic examples involving brain injury, drug and alcohol, medical rehabilitation, physical disabilities, and aging will be provided. Balancing consumer and family needs will be debated. Caregiver telehealth solutions will be introduced.

Handouts

Tracks: LD
W41 | Mindful Leadership
Ricardo Horn, LMSW | Pyramid Healthcare, Inc.
Nicole Zmuda, MSW, MEd, LCSW | Pyramid Healthcare, Inc.
Winnie Nagle, LPC, PhD | Pyramid Healthcare, Inc.
Room: TBA
The health care administrators, facing an increasingly complex industry, require proper leadership development. This presentation reviews core competencies of effective health care leadership, introduces mindfulness concepts, and merges them to promote a dynamic approach. Through cultivation of a mindfulness-informed style, health care administrators can address the myriad challenges they face with improved decision-making, objectivity, resilience, and insight. Attendees will participate in both lecture and experiential learning, as they will have the opportunity to complete a pre- and post- mindfulness inventory and practice mindfulness in guided exercises.

Handouts

Tracks: IDD
W42 | Skill Building Plans: Making Instruction and Progress Reporting Efficient
Stacy Nonnemacher, PhD | Office of Developmental Programs/Bureau of Autism Services
Amy Alford, MEd, BCBA | Office of Developmental Programs/Bureau of Autism Services
Room: TBA
Systematically planning for skill building is important in supporting an individual to live an Everyday Life. This workshop will review components of a Skill Building Plan (SBP) as an effective model for enhancing acquisition and maintenance of skills that promote independence and participation in the community. As a way to report on progress, Goal Attainment Scaling will be introduced. Implementation and considerations into existing service delivery systems will be discussed. Examples, non-examples, and opportunities to practice skills in real time will be incorporated throughout this workshop.

Handouts

Tracks: BO, ExL, HRF, LD
W46 | Transforming a Workforce through Servant Leadership
Dr. Rhea Fernandes, PsyD | Devereux Advanced Behavioral Health
Mary Imbornone, MEd | Devereux Advanced Behavioral Health
Dr. Patricia Hillis-Clark, PsyD, BCBA | Devereux Advanced Behavioral Health
Room: TBA
The behavioral health care field is evolving, and a staffing crisis is leading to employee burnout. Servant Leadership is a methodology that increases employee engagement. The 2017 “Fortune 100 Best Companies to Work for” reports that five of the top 10 businesses were Servant Leadership organizations. By deploying this methodology, agencies can create a work environment where employees feel empowered to voice ideas that will benefit its clients, staff, and the overall organization. This presentation will provide an overview of the steps that a behavioral health agency has taken to implement Servant Leadership, along with tips to create organizational buy-in and measure success.

Handouts

Thursday, September 26 • 9:00 am – 10:30 am

Tracks: ExL, HR, LD
W43 | The Impact of Leadership on Culture and Performance Part 1
Thomas J. Sullivan, MPA | UPMC
John Amato, MEd | Familylinks
Room: TBA
There’s no denying leadership’s role in determining how well your organization performs. The cumulative impact of each leader’s actions, such as their ability to exemplify the values of the organization, exhibit high levels of emotional intelligence, and create an engaging workplace is what creates success or failure. In this workshop, we will provide a framework for understanding an organization’s culture, the factors leading to and reinforcing that culture, and the most important “levers” for moving an organization in the desired direction to achieve better outcomes.

Handouts

Tracks: DA, ExL, MH
W44 | Transitioning to The ASAM Criteria: The Underlying Principles
Dorothy J. Farr, LSW, LADC, CCDP-D | Farr Consulting, LLC
Room: TBA
The Pennsylvania Substance Use Disorder (SUD) system of care is moving to a more client-centered, outcomes-driven, evidence-based approach to level-of care-determination and clinical decision making with our transition to the ASAM Criteria. During this session, we will explore how The ASAM Criteria builds on and enhances the concepts underlying the Pennsylvania Client Placement Criteria. We will look at how the ASAM Criteria advances access to treatment for individuals seeking services who experience co-occurring challenges, and delve into the importance of language and how it impacts our ability to successfully engage individuals in a recovery process. We will also discuss key strategies remaining current with any updates. This workshop will serve as an introductory overview to the ASAM criteria, but it will not suffice to replace required clinical training.

Handouts

Tracks: CH, MH
W45 | Mobile Crisis Teams: Looking at the Big and Small Picture
John Muehsam, MSW, PhD(c), LSW, CAADC, CPRP | Elwyn
Maria Perkins, MS, LPC | Elwyn
Room: TBA
Mobile crisis teams (MCT) are a commonly utilized intervention for enhancing communities’ continuum of crisis services. The presenters will introduce some of their research and work in MCTs in Delaware and Philadelphia counties over the last six years. The first part of the presentation will review national statistical trends and comment on the relationship between the crisis experience and a broader experience of self in the United States. We will then explore some of the findings from a study published by one of the presenters analyzing data from a Delaware County MCT. We conclude by describing our recent partnership with Community Behavioral Health in developing our experience and research into an innovative MCT in Philadelphia.

Handouts

Tracks: BO, ExL, HRF, LD
W46 | Transforming a Workforce through Servant Leadership
Dr. Rhea Fernandes, PsyD | Devereux Advanced Behavioral Health
Mary Imbornone, MEd | Devereux Advanced Behavioral Health
Dr. Patricia Hillis-Clark, PsyD, BCBA | Devereux Advanced Behavioral Health
Room: TBA
The behavioral health care field is evolving, and a staffing crisis is leading to employee burnout. Servant Leadership is a methodology that increases employee engagement. The 2017 “Fortune 100 Best Companies to Work for” reports that five of the top 10 businesses were Servant Leadership organizations. By deploying this methodology, agencies can create a work environment where employees feel empowered to voice ideas that will benefit its clients, staff, and the overall organization. This presentation will provide an overview of the steps that a behavioral health agency has taken to implement Servant Leadership, along with tips to create organizational buy-in and measure success.

Handouts

Tracks: MH, VR
W47 | Using Evidence-Based Practice Supported Employment to Secure Work for Individuals with Serious Mental Illness
Randy Loss, MA, CRC | PA Office of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services
Room: TBA
Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) Supported Employment (SE) is one of the most beneficial tools to assist an individual with serious mental illness or severe emotional disorder (SMI/SED) in gaining employment. EBP SE is currently used within various OMHSAS supported programs across Pennsylvania. As part of implementing Governor Wolf’s Employment First initiative, it is anticipated that increasing the use of these services can benefit individuals diagnosed with mental illness in gaining employment. This session will explain and review the benefits of EBP SE, identify examples within PA and in other states, and finally, discuss how PA could look to expand use of this model.

Handouts

Tracks: IDD
W48 | Supporting Deaf or Hard of Hearing Individuals with Developmental Disabilities
Krista Lewis | Office of Developmental Programs, Special Populations Unit
Lori Milcic | Office of Developmental Programs, Special Populations Unit
Melissa Hawkins | Department of Labor and Industry, Office for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing
Lea Sheffield | Office of Developmental Programs, Special Populations Unit
Kelly Lukens Ruiz | Office of Developmental Programs, Special Populations Unit
Room: TBA
This presentation will provide an overview on hearing loss, assistive technology, deaf cultural norms, modes of communication, interpreting in Pennsylvania, and best support strategies for families and support professionals. Additionally, information on using the LifeCourse as a tool in supporting an individual’s vision for a good life will be shared. Attendees will leave this training with a new way of thinking about, and valuable information on, how to better support deaf or hard of hearing individuals with a developmental disability.

Handouts

Tracks: MH
W49 | Best Practices in Suicide Risk Assessment and Crisis Response Planning
Jessica R. Umbrell, PsyD | PerformCare, Pennsylvania
Room: TBA
According to Center for Disease Control data, the number of completed suicides nationally is on the rise. This has led to an overall decrease in life expectancy. To a large extent, practitioners at various levels of care do not have access to the current best practice standards for risk assessment and crisis response planning. This presentation will provide an overview of common risk and protective factors and show how to complete a best practice risk assessment. Clinicians will learn how to assess risk and protective factors in order to develop a comprehensive crisis response plan. Hands-on practice with case examples will be a part of the learning process.

Handouts

Thursday, September 26 • 10:45 am – 12:15 pm

Tracks: ExL, LD, HR
W50 | The Impact of Leadership on Culture and Performance Part 2
Thomas J. Sullivan, MPA | UPMC
John Amato, MEd | Familylinks
Room: TBA
There’s no denying leadership’s role in determining how well your organization performs. The cumulative impact of each leader’s actions, such as their ability to exemplify the values of the organization, exhibit high levels of emotional intelligence, and create an engaging workplace is what creates success or failure. In this workshop, we will provide a framework for understanding an organization’s culture, the factors leading to and reinforcing that culture, and the most important “levers” for moving an organization in the desired direction to achieve better outcomes.

Handouts

Tracks: CH, LD
W51 | Optimize Children’s Services Through Transformational Leadership
Robena Spangler, MS | DHS, Office of Children, Youth and Families
Corlene Ocker, PhD | Pyramid Healthcare, Inc.
Jim Sharp, MS | Rehabilitation & Community Providers Association
Room: TBA
Unfunded mandates, absence of data to inform decisions, inadequate funding levels, licensing, and compliance issues are some of the challenges facing children’s providers. Principles of transformational leadership as an approach inspire leaders and followers to take ownership for their work of organizations, and align them with activities that optimize performance. This approach challenges perceptions, values expectations that lead to change, and promotes “redesign” of organizational culture.

Handouts

Tracks: BO, CO, DA
W52 | The SUPPORT for Patients and Communities Act: What You Need to Know About the New Law’s Expansion of Criminal Laws Against Paying for Patient Referrals
Antonio Pozos, JD | Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP
Room: TBA
The SUPPORT for Patients and Communities Act was the result of a bipartisan effort to “reduce access to the supply of opioids by expanding access to prevention, treatment, and recovery services.” Enacted in October 2018, the SUPPORT Act also contains broad prohibitions against paying or receiving any “remuneration” (including bribes, kickbacks, or rebates) in exchange for patient referrals to a recovery home, clinical treatment facility, or laboratory, or paying remuneration in exchange for an individual using the services of such a provider. The law carries significant penalties, including up to 10 years in prison and fines of up to $200,000, for each violation. The program will educate providers about the new law and associated “safe harbors,” discuss common situations that create legal risks under the SUPPORT Act, and outline compliance best practices for ensuring that providers comply with the SUPPORT Act.

Handouts

Tracks: LD, MH
W53 | Clinical Supervision in Community Mental Health Settings: Moving Towards Excellence While Creating Extraordinary Experiences
John T. Spychalski, MEd, Licensed Psychologist | Community Services Group, Lancaster Out-Patient
Amanda Katchur, PsyD, Licensed Psychologist | Community Services Group, Lancaster Out-Patient
Koren Anderson, MA, LPC | Community Services Group, Lancaster Out-Patient
Room: TBA
Community Mental Health Centers, due to the diversity of clients, are challenging to clinicians. Likewise, the variety of clinical staff presents a need for flexible approaches to clinical supervision. This presentation is intended for both supervisors and staff, demonstrating how clinical supervisors can identify and support the individual needs of their staff, while helping staff to identify and reach for the support they need.

Handouts

Tracks: IDD
W54 | Supporting Choice in Relationships for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities
David K. Attryde, MS, LPC | Resources for Human Development
Riki Geyer, MSW | Resources for Human Development
Room: TBA
The IDD system and society at large has moved toward greater recognition of the rights of individuals with disabilities to live “Everyday Lives.” However, many still struggle with the logistics, and even the concept of truly extending everyday lives into emotionally and sexually intimate relationships. This workshop will discuss complex issues around sex and dating, including consent, safety, community/family stigma, sex education, and privacy.

Handouts

Tracks: DA, HRF, MH, VR
W55 | Strategies to Enhance the Peer Workforce: Implementation of the Peer Support Supervision Toolkit
Kim MacDonald-Wilson, ScD, CRC, CPRP | Community Care Behavioral Health
Shari Hutchison, MS, PMP | Community Care Behavioral Health
Tracy Carney, CPS, CPSS | Community Care Behavioral Health
Room: TBA
Peer-provided behavioral health services are associated with high engagement rates and positive outcomes. Thus, calls to develop the behavioral health workforce include strategies to recruit and retain qualified peer staff. This workshop will describe a multi-pronged approach from a behavioral health managed care organization, state and county stakeholders, and providers to enhance peer services and the peer workforce. Initiatives include an evaluation, development of service performance standards, and a learning collaborative to support implementation of peer supervision strategies. To date, findings show a marked increase (19%) in the number of group supervision sessions and increase in the number of peer staff with supervision plans. The presentation will conclude with a discussion of lessons learned by peer support supervisors and the collaborative.

Handouts

Tracks: IDD, VR
W56 | Capital Area Employment First Coalition –Embracing Employment First through Collaboration
Dan Sausman, BS – Panel Moderator | Case Management Unit (CMU)
Mark Evans, BS | Cumberland/Perry Mental Health-Intellectual Developmental Disabilities Program
Adam Wiener | Dauphin County Mental Health/Autism/Developmental Program
Heather Berra, MEd | Central Dauphin East High School
Christine M. Roggenbaum, BA | Goodwill Keystone Area
Kelly Arnold | Office of Developmental Programs, Central Region
Room: TBA
Representatives will present a panel discussion to share learning, collaboration, and successes that have been achieved through the Employment 1st Coalition in Cumberland, Perry, and Dauphin counties.

Handouts

Tracks: CH, LD, MH
W57 | Rural Trauma-Informed System of Care in Pennsylvania: A 15,000 Square Mile View
Chris Minnich, MEd | Behavioral Health Alliance of Rural Pennsylvania
Judy Davis, BA | Behavioral Health Alliance of Rural Pennsylvania
Monica Payne, MA | Youth and Family Training Institute
Samantha Pulleo, BS | Youth and Family Training Institute
Margaret Ennis, JD | Wayne County Behavioral and Developmental Programs & Early Intervention
Room: TBA
The BHARP System of Care (SOC) Project is comprised of twenty-three rural counties in central Pennsylvania spanning more than 15,000 square miles. BHARP was successful in acquiring a SAMHSA grant which focused on core activities, including developing youth and family driven systems of care, cross systems county leadership teams, and trauma informed systems of care. This session will provide an interactive experience while the BHARP SOC leaders discuss how goals were set and accomplished related to the core activities. Also discussed will be the importance of relationships, best practices, and evaluation across different systems — with a particular focus on advancing trauma-informed care — all while promoting the “Commonwealth” approach to governance. The approaches and successes of the primary implementation counties will be highlighted.

Handouts

Thursday, September 26 • 2:15 pm – 3:45 pm

Tracks: CH, LD, MH
W58 | ESFT: A Systemic Approach for Traumatized Families
John Muehsam, MSW, PhD(c), LSW, CAADC, CPRP | Elwyn
Gabrielle Desnouee, MS, LPC, BCBA | Elwyn
Room: TBA
Ecosystemic Structural Family Therapy (ESFT) is a treatment orientation that recognizes the role social systems and trauma have in individuals’ lives. This presentation will explore relevant sociological theories related to how social systems affect individuals and families. Participants will engage with the theories in an accessible and interesting manner with particular attention to their relevance for human services. This will include a discussion of Bloom’s work on traumatized human service systems. The second half of the presentation will discuss how ESFT takes these insights seriously in our clinical work. The presenters will discuss the basic concepts of ESFT as well as their work implementing this treatment in the context of a large behavioral health agency with diverse program offerings for children and adults.

Handouts

Tracks: CO, ExL, HRF, LD
W59 | One Agency’s Lesson Learned – Workplace Violence
Fran Sheedy Bost, MEd | TCV Community Services
Casey Monaghan | TCV Community Services
Ed Shea | Babb, Inc.
Room: TBA
On November 11, 2016, TCV Community Services experienced a major incident of workplace violence. This experience has catapulted the executive director into a mission of prevention, preparation, and response for senior managers of fellow community-based service providers. The presenter will challenge you to examine your current safety climate and culture, and drive change within your organization. Experiences and knowledge, as they relate to roles and responsibilities, prioritization of safety across all organizational levels from the board of directors to the front line staff, key elements for prevention, ways to effectively manage catastrophic events inside your buildings, and how to minimize a provider’s exposure to loss will be shared.

Handouts

Tracks: ExL, HRF, IDD
W60 | Managed Care Quality Measures for I/DD Services
Joan W. Martin | Wojdak Government Relations
Alissa Eden Halperin, Esq. | Halperin Butera
Donna Martin, MEd | ANCOR
Room: TBA
This session will highlight the national health care industry with respect to developing and validating quality measures used in I/DD managed care programs. This workshop will discuss different kinds of health care measures that are currently in use and ones being developed, including HEDIS measures, I/DD and LTSS specific measures, and National Core Indicators.

Handouts

Tracks: ExL, HRF, LD
W61 | Meet Me in the Middle
Suzanne Daub, LCSW | Health Management Associates
Marsha Johnson, LCSW | Health Management Associates
Andrew Kind-Rubin, PhD | Child Giudance Resource Centers
Room: TBA
In 2019, leaders of most health care organizations face a “VUCA” world (Volatile, Uncertain, Complex and Ambiguous). For this reason, organizations often invest in leadership support for executive teams as they respond to ever-emerging opportunities and challenges. However, the organization’s strategic priorities, values, and culture are driven at the care delivery level by middle managers and supervisors of frontline staff. The role and potential of the middle manager/supervisor will be explored using key principals from frameworks such as Learning Health System, Hive Mind, Troika Consulting, and leadership coaching. Best practices that middle managers can use to create processes and feedback cycles that promote continuous learning, improvement, and resilience in the workforce will be presented.

Handouts

Tracks: DA, MH
W62 | Are We Doing Our Very Best? Exploring the Challenges Caused by Co-occurring Conditions
Dorothy J. Farr, LSW, LADC, CCDP-D | Farr Consulting, LLC
Room: TBA
It is not always easy to recognize the difference between a substance induced condition, and the presence of a co-existing mental health issue. Yet, research has clearly demonstrated that if we hope to help individuals enter and sustain long-term recovery, it is essential to do so. This distinction is critical in the development of an individualized treatment plan designed to achieve recovery goals. This workshop will review the importance of offering integrated treatment services for persons with co-occurring mental health, physical health, and substance use conditions. We will review the expectations of our 2006 COD Bulletin, discuss efforts underway to further our competency, and examine the advances in this industry since the Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP 42) was last published in 2013.

Handouts

Tracks: BI, CH, DA, HRF, IDD, LD, MH, MR, PDA, VR
W63 | When Helpers Need Help: Doing for Yourself What You Do for Others
Pam Schaefer, MS | KenCrest Services
Room: TBA
As a helper, healer, or caregiver, it is easy to fall into the habit of putting your own needs last. You may also not realize that you have become caught in a toxic relationship or are ignoring the signs that you need to recharge yourself. This workshop will examine how the brain/body connection responds to stress, how to assess for stressors, and how to develop easy self-care plans for busy people.

Handouts

Tracks: CH, EL, HRF, MH
W64 | The Capital Area’s Value-Based Purchasing Program for Family Based – A Review of its First Year
Scott Suhring | Capital Area Behavioral Health Collaborative, Inc.
Scott Daubert, PhD | PerformCare
Dan Warner, PhD | Community Data Roundtable
Tara L. Byers, MS, NCC, LPC, ACS | Pennsylvania Counseling Services
Room: TBA
As a part of its movement toward value-based purchasing, the Capital Area Behavioral Health Collaborative (CABHC) kicked off an outcomes-driven, case-rate program in July 2018. All family based mental health providers in the network reconcile payment to a case-rate based on consumer length of stay, as well as outcomes performance as rated on the Child and Adolescent Needs and Strengths (CANS). The initiative is implemented collaboratively, with stakeholder representation throughout the process. This presentation will provide multiple perspectives, including the HealthChoices group, the BH-MCO, a provider, and the outcomes consultants. They will discuss the motivation for the initiative, some of the milestones and lessons learned from the implementation, and a review of some of the first year’s outcomes.

Handouts

Friday, September 27 • 9:00 am – 10:30 am

Tracks: CH, ExL, IDD
W65 | ANCOR Update: What’s Happening in Washington, DC
Gabrielle Sedor | ANCOR – the American Network for Community Options and Resources
Room: Magnolia AB
ANCOR is proud to represent disability service providers as their national trade association in Washington, DC. Join ANCOR for an informative session detailing the latest of what is happening in Congress, the federal agencies, and the White House that impacts people with disabilities and their service providers. From Medicaid reform efforts to new positions on state flexibility, a revised approach to issuing rules and regulations, and policies that impact workforce, there is much to share! ANCOR COO Gabrielle Sedor will delve into the federal relations work that ANCOR does in the heart of the nation’s capital and share insider knowledge about what policies are making their way from Washington, DC to your agency or organization!

Handouts

Tracks: MH
W66 | Behavioral Health National Policy Update and Trends Overview Including PA Behavioral HealthChoices as a “Keystone” for the Future of Whole-Person Care
Chuck Ingoglia | National Council for Behavioral Health
Charles Curie | The Curie Group, LLC
Room: Red Ballroom
This workshop will include federal updates on behavioral health policy issues from the National Council. The presenters will then delve deeply into the current status of Behavioral Health (BH) Medicaid Carve-outs vs Carve-ins, with a particular focus on the successes of Pennsylvania’s Carve-out, and how it has accelerated the efforts in achieving integrated care, addressing social determinants of health, and implementing value-based purchasing. A focus on the adverse outcomes realized in states that have moved from successful BH Carve-outs to Carving in BH will be considered. You are invited to join the discussion as behavioral health services continue to be at a crossroads of change in health care delivery.

Handouts